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Faculty Spotlight: Alan Harvey

This installment of Faculty Spotlight features Alan Harvey, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Biology in the College of Science and Mathematics. Harvey has a wide range of scientific interests, and his most recent research demonstrates how plants recruit ants as bodyguards by providing sweet treats in return for protection. Harvey is also a documentary filmmaker, creating short films for many of his own research projects as well as those of his students and colleagues.

 

This article was originally posted on March 8, 2017 and can be found here.


CHHS faculty, student, alumni concussion research published

Faculty, alumni and students in the College of Health and Human Sciences (CHHS), whose research focuses on the effects of concussions, recently had a study published in the American Journal of Physiology – Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

John Dobson, Ph.D., associate professor in the School of Health and Kinesiology, Mary Beth Yarbrough (‘16), CHHS alumna and academic advisor, Jose Perez, graduate exercise science student, and Kelsey Evans (‘15), CHHS alumna, in collaboration with Thomas Buckley, Ed.D., from the University of Delaware, teamed up to write “Sport-Related Concussion Induces Transient Cardiovascular Autonomic Dysfunction.”

Dobson, along with colleagues, has spent the past several years investigating the effects of concussions on cardiovascular function. The study included 12 college students who had suffered a concussion while participating in a recreational sport. Students were compared to 11 controlled participants who were matched by sex, height and mass and had no history of concussions.

Researchers administered tests that measured involuntary changes in heart rate and blood pressure. The study found that concussions cause short-term impairment of the cardiovascular system, but symptoms typically resolve within three days of the injury.

“This was the most difficult study I have ever conducted because it took two and a half years to collect the data, and the analyses were very complicated,” said Dobson. “However, we had a fantastic research team consisting of three excellent graduate students and one other faculty member. We are thrilled that our study was published in the prestigious American Journal of Physiology – Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, and that the American Physiological Society just recognized it through an official press release.”

Read the full article here.

Georgia Southern University, a public Carnegie Doctoral/Research University founded in 1906, offers more than 125 degree programs serving 20,673 students. Through eight colleges, the University offers bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degree programs built on more than a century of academic achievement. Georgia Southern is recognized for its student-centered and hands-on approach to education. Visit GeorgiaSouthern.edu.

This article was originally posted on March 1, 2017 and can be found here.


IT Graduate and Undergraduate Students Win Best Paper Award at SE DSI

Kennitha Cochrum and Tiffany Carpenter were presenters at the 2017 SE SDI Conference.

The paper titled “Predicting IMDB Score: An Application of Decision Trees” by Geanna Torres, Kennitha Cochrum, Jonathan Covington and Tiffany Carpenter took first place in the undergraduate student paper award competition at the 2017 meeting of Southeast Decision Sciences Institute (SE DSI). The 47th annual conference was held in Charleston, SC on February 22 – 24, 2017. Kennitha Cochrum and Tiffany Carpenter were the presenters at the conference. Geanna, Kennitha, Jonathan and Tiffany are all seniors in the BS in Information Technology program at Georgia Southern University.

Sushmita Khan took first place in the graduate student paper award competition.

The paper titled “Grouping Students According to IT-Related Ethical Behavior: An Application of the Clustering Algorithm” by Sushmita Khan took first place in the graduate student paper award competition.  Sushmita is in her second semester in the MS in Applied Engineering in the IT track.

SE DSI is a regional subdivision of the Decision Sciences Institute, a professional organization of academicians and practitioners interested in the application of quantitative and behavioral methods to the problems of society.

All students started the project in their data mining course in the IT program last semester and were mentored by their faculty advisor, Dr. Cheryl Aasheim, Professor of Information Technology.

 

This article was originally posted on March 1, 2017 and can be found here.


Reefs and Rivers: the Altamaha’s connection to us

Georgia Southern faculty Daniel Gleason, Ph.D., and Risa Cohen, Ph.D., spent years planning and building their research of the Altamaha River’s flow patterns, and the results show the man-made impacts along Georgia’s coast.

Gleason and Cohen worked with graduate students to monitor the flow of the Altamaha River to determine how substances are dispersed off the coast. To accomplish this, they released a non-toxic, fluorescent red dye to the water and also tracked offshore flow patterns with hand-made, satellite-enabled drifters. They teamed up with Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary for the study, and released their first 50 gallons of dye in 2011.

Not long after, the duo applied for the Coastal Incentive Grant grant from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources to further their research, and were awarded $145,000. They continued their research and conducted dye and drifter releases again in 2014 and 2015.

From their research, the team discovered the flow offshore from the Altamaha River was far different than once predicted. Rather than traveling south, substances were dispersed in various directions based on the season. In the fall when there was less rainfall and flow out of the river was reduced, the dye and drifters traveled south as predicted. In the spring when there was more rainfall and thus more water flowing out of the Altamaha, the dye and drifters traveled many miles offshore, even into the middle of the Atlantic Ocean off Massachusetts.

The findings were crucial to understanding how the habits of residents everywhere from Atlanta to Savannah affect the kinds of substances that are distributed into oceanic waters. Gray’s Reef, for example, may experience everything from valuable nutrients to harmful pollutants from the Altamaha’s outflow.

“The nutrients that come from the river are great, but the dissolved chemicals are what can hurt these delicate ecosystems,” said Gleason. “For example, when parked cars drip oil, that oil runs off and eventually ends up in the river system. Components of that oil can be taken offshore by streams and rivers. Just because you seem a long way from these ecosystems doesn’t mean you don’t have a significant impact on them.”

Alan Harvey, Ph.D., professor of biology, created a short film titled “Connections” that detailed the research and findings. Harvey worked with graduate student Brianne Varnerin to create this video.

Gleason encourages any students and community or school groups to contact him to learn more about this program.

“We strongly encourage groups to come learn how to make these drifters so that they can release them at other locations themselves,” said Gleason. “The more data we have, the better!”

To learn more about the research and how to build your own drifter, contact Daniel Gleason at dgleason@georgiasouthern.edu.
Georgia Southern University, a public Carnegie Doctoral/Research University founded in 1906, offers more than 125 degree programs serving 20,673 students. Through eight colleges, the University offers bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degree programs built on more than a century of academic achievement. Georgia Southern is recognized for its student-centered and hands-on approach to education. Visit GeorgiaSouthern.edu.

 

This article was originally posted on March 1, 2017 and can be found here.


Call for Proposals Extended!

The call for abstracts/proposals to 2017 Research Symposium has been extended to Monday, March 6th! All students from Georgia Southern University are invited to apply. The Research Symposium is a conference style showcase of undergraduate and graduate student research across multiple disciplines. This event includes speakers, poster and oral presentation sessions from all academic disciplines.

The Research Symposium will be held on APRIL 14, 2017 in Statesboro, GA at the Nessmith-Lane Conference Center on the Georgia Southern University campus.  (Map)

SUBMIT AN ABSTRACT/PROPOSAL

Abstract/Proposal Submission Deadline: March 6, 2017

 

PRESENTATION TOPICS                                                                             

·         Business Administration

·         Public Health & Well-being

·         Natural and Physical Sciences

·         Education and Learning

·         Engineering and Material Sciences

·         Liberal Arts and Social Sciences

·         Exercise Science and Human Performance

·         Computer Science and Information Technology

 

Abstract/proposals submissions will be considered for poster presentations, oral presentations, or performing or visual arts. A faculty advisor is required for submission. Space is limited; not every submission will be chosen.  A review committee will evaluate each submission for content and relevance. Abstracts can be submitted under only ONE topic area and must include an abstract synopsis of 300 words or less.  All presenters must register for the Symposium online at http://research.georgiasouthern.edu/symposium.

 

All final presentations will also be uploaded to Digital Commons.

 

For more information or to ask questions about the Annual Research Symposium, please contact Kim Iannacone at kim-iannacone@georgiasouthern.edu


GS Research • P.O. Box 8140, Statesboro, GA 30458 • (912) 478-8641 • research@georgiasouthern.edu